Kurt Kleiner
Clips


Toronto Star

Right or wrong, it's science
A scientific study proves that most scientific studies are wrong. Scientists say, 'That's science.'

Our operators are standing by

Giggle if you must, but astronomers are still waiting for a phone call from outer space. It's a size issue.

Perchance to nap?
A tribute to the soft pleasures of dozing, backed up by hard science.

Economist

Cutting the competition
An evolutionary explanation for circumcision

Eyeing up the collaboration
The whites of the eyes suggest early humans were co-operative.

Patient capital
How patience doomed egalitarian society.

Mrs. Adam Smith
Modern humanity's battle with Neanderthals may have been won by the women who invented the division of labour.

New Scientist

Meats, no shoots, no leaves
Arctic explorer Vilhjalmur Stefansson had a radical idea -- man really could live on meat alone. To prove it, he did just that.

Stone Age Kalashnikov
Most humans stopped hunting with atlatls -- or spear throwers -- 10,000 years ago. But modern atlatl-maker Bob Perkins finds a surprising sophistication in the stone-age weapons.

Brainless wonders
You don't need microprocessors or clever programming to make robots that behave like living creatures.

Saving for the future

Information could live forever (whether we like it or not).

Technology Review

Supercharged file sharing
Cooperating with file-sharing networks could avert congestion.

How Spam is Improving AI
Anti-spam puzzles are helping researchers develop smarter algorithms.

U of T magazine

Why smart people do stupid things
How can smart people be so boneheaded? Because intelligence and rationality aren't the same.

Nature Reports: Climate Change

The bright prospect of biochar
Enthusiasts say that biochar could go a long way towards mitigating climate change and bring with it a host of ancillary benefits. But others fear it could do more harm than good.

Peak Energy: Promise or Peril?
The notion that we're running out of fossil fuel is gaining support in some unexpected quarters. But is peak energy good or bad news for the climate?